Second post for ED 808

Our assignment was to:

Step 1. You are encouraged to revisit Dr. Joel Westheimer & Dr. Bill Ayers’ recorded Skype presentations with our class.

Step 2. Answer the following questions:

Using Drs. Westheimer & Ayers as a starting point, how do you, as an educator and/or citizen, view the role of the education system?

How do YOU connect or make personally relevant the broad social justice themes discussed in your first post vis-a-vis Westheimer & Ayers as well as your own new thinking on the matter?

And finally, How has your position, as evidenced in your initial post on social justice, changed or been further confirmed? Provide concrete examples.

 

I created a my response for this post by using Pixton, an online comic creator.

I apologize for the comic being small, but I couldn’t get the embed code offered by Pixton to work properly. Check it out here (in a size you can read) via the Pixton site.

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I chose to make a comic, in order to not only try out an online program, but to tell my narrative using a different form of communication as opposed to traditional text. Throughout the comic, I believe that I share my views on the role of the education traditionally and what I envision it as, I incorporate ideas shared from both Dr. Westheimer and Dr. Ayers, as well as referencing ideas from my introductory post, and expanding on them as my understandings of social justice have continued to develop.

In regards to the prompt,

How has your position, as evidenced in your initial post on social justice, changed or been further confirmed? Provide concrete examples.

this is the one area that may not be as clear from viewing the comic.

I believe that my position has further been confirmed through insights from both guest lecturers, in that social justice does indeed belong as part of the curriculum. I take the view that it is up to each individual educator to take up teaching about and for social justice within their practice and to their students. Even though our school system calls for testing and accountability, teaching the curriculum and measuring student success, I think that this can all be done through teaching about social justice issues and concern. I think the notion that social justice topics can be taught in schools is an important one, especially when educators face challenges from schools or parents for example when reading stories with LGBT characters, or talking about queer history. While this can be hard for a teacher, if they know that what they are doing is important work, and that they believe their students should learn about social justice topics, I hope they can remain “hopeful” and know that what they are doing matters and can make a difference not only to students in their classrooms, but in working to question and bring change to larger systems and structures.

 

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Social Justice: taking action GSAs

For ED 808, we are to,

practice agency in trying to ameliorate, solve, or otherwise begin to improve an issue of your choosing involving a social justice cause. It may take the form of a petition, a letter to a politician, a personal/group action, setting up a website, volunteering some of your time somewhere where it’s needed, or other initiatives to foster positive local, regional, provincial, national, or global change.

I decided to write a letter to four people, regarding the need for Gender & Sexuality Alliances (commonly known and Gay-Straight Alliances) to be implemented in all publicly funded schools within Saskatchewan. If you’d like to check out the letter, you can view it here.

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After I mailed the letters to the following people:

  • Rob Currie – Director Education, Regina Catholic Schools
  • Premier Brad Wall – Premier of Saskatchewan
  • Don Morgan – SK Minister of Education
  • Bill Hutchinson – Local MLA

I was pointed to these articles, which offer information regarding GSAs in schools.

The first is an article, “Catholic schools ahead of push for gay-straight alliance support groups: Students needs forcing issue, bishop sayspublished October 28. This article is a step in the right direction, however the central problem remains: students are forced to “come out” or to specifically ask for a GSA to be started, and many times, these groups are not approved by school administration.

The next article was a document just published by the SK Ministry of Education – Deepening the Discussion: Gender and Sexual Diversity.” This document is also a step in the right direction, but as with the previous article, the central problem still remains. The other area of my concern is what is meant by the term inclusion. While well meaning, this term still “others” LGBTQ youth and I question as to whether the information presented in this document while help the inclusion of LGBTQ youth in our schools. This document does however works to support staff, offering them information to help understand LGBTQ youth, to work to support these students, and links to the SK Curriculum. On pages 28-31, the area (which I am concerned about) that discusses GSAs, I believe not much has been offered holding schools accountable to make sure that GSAs are approved and started. It is recommended that students are questioned as to why they would like a GSA to be started and there is no mandate that an adviser will be made available. Regardless, the document is positive, and I hope schools take the time to read through it and adopt the practices it is suggesting.